Freemasons thanked for air ambulance support

Freemasons will be flying high as their logo has been placed on their local air ambulance in recognition of their support.

The Bristol Freemasons were one of the first groups to support the Great Western Air Ambulance Charity when it was formed in 2008, and continue to be a great supporter nine years on. To date they have donated an impressive £103,567.

GWAAC relies on the public to raise the £2.6 million a year needed to stay operational, and this money has helped to ensure the crew can reach more people in need across the city.
To mark this support the Freemasons logo has been placed on the helicopter, and representatives from the Bristol province visited the base to hear more about the vital life-saving service.
In 2016 the crew attended 1,735 jobs, and of these 39.7% were in Bristol. Tim Brunton from Bristol Freemasons said:

“We are proud to see the Masonic Square and Compass on the side of the Great Western Air Ambulance Charity helicopter, which does a hugely important job saving lives every day across Bristol and beyond.”

The Bristol Freemasons were joined by representatives from the Gloucestershire and Somerset provinces, including GWAAC trustee and Freemason Jonathan Skeeles, who was involved in forming GWAAC in 2008. In total the three provinces have raised £130,584.35. GWAAC’s Chief Executive John Christensen said:

“We have been blown away by the generosity of the Freemasons, and wanted to do something to recognise the huge contribution they have made to our charity. It seemed fitting to have their logo placed on our helicopter, as this will be visible wherever we go across the six counties we cover. I was delighted to be able to meet representatives from the three provinces to thank them in person, and tell them more about how their support has made a big difference to us.”

GWAAC receives no day to day funding from the Government or National Lottery, and so support from organisations such as the Freemasons is crucial in ensuring the charity can stay operational.

by Andy Crow